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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Protective Effects of Naringenin in a Rat Model of Sepsis-Triggered Acute Kidney Injury via Activation of Antioxidant Enzymes and Reduction in Urinary Angiotensinogen

Lin Mu, Guoxin Hu, Jian Liu, Yan Chen, Wenjuan Cui, Lujun Qiao

(Department of Critical Care Medicine, Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, Dongying, Shandong, China (mainland))

Med Sci Monit 2019; 25:5986-5991

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.916400


BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a devastating medical condition. In the USA, about 745 000 people are diagnosed with sepsis annually. Although many anti-inflammatory drugs have been used to manage sepsis, the treatment success rate is very low. This study was undertaken to examine the protective effects of naringenin on sepsis-induced kidney injury in rats.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sepsis was induced in Wistar albino rats by cecal ligation and puncture methods. Histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were determined by flow cytometery. TUNEL assay was used to demonstrate apoptosis. Sandwich ELISA method was used for the determination of urinary angiotensinogen, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis.
RESULTS: We found that naringenin decreased atrophy in the glomerulus and enabled maintenance of the capsule area and normal tubular cavity of the septic rats. Admistration of naringenin at the dosage of 10 and 20 mg/kg to sepsis rats caused significant reduction in the sepsis-induced apoptosis of kidney cells, accompanied by decrease in Bax and increase in Bcl-2 expression. Moreover, naringenin also decreased the ROS levels in septic rats and downregulated the expression of SOD, CAT, and APX. The effects of naringenin were also examined on the levels of urinary angiotensinogen in sepsis rats. We found that naringenin caused a significant decrease in urinary angiotensinogen levels of septic rats.
CONCLUSIONS: Naringenin appears to have potential in the treatment of sepsis.

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