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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Establishment of a Gentamicin Cochlear Poisoning Model in Guinea Pigs and Cochlear Nerve Endings Recognition of Ultrasound Signals

Fusen Wang, Shusheng Gong, Yuee Zhou, Chengcheng Huang, Tiegang Li, Qian Li, Xinyu Ceng, Chaoyan Wang

(Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Southern Medical University Affiliated Shenzhen Baoan Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China (mainland))

Med Sci Monit 2018; 24:9429-9435

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.913205


BACKGROUND: Aminoglycosides, a type of gram-negative antibacterial, are broad-spectrum antibiotics that are highly potent and have satisfactory therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Our study aimed to establish a gentamicin-induced cochlear injury model and to investigate the cochlear nerve endings’ recognition of ultrasound signals.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A guinea pig cochlear injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of gentamycin. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and fMRI an affected cerebral cortex region of interest (ROI) of the cerebral cortex blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect was induced by bone-conducted ultrasound. Immunofluorescence was used to detect expression of Prestin in outer hair cells, Otoferlin in inner hair cells, and cochlear hair cell microfilament protein (F-Actin).
RESULTS: For 30–35 KHz bone-conducted ultrasound, the induction rate of ABR threshold or ROI in the control group and the cochlear injury group was 40% and 0%, respectively, and for 80–90 KHz the induction rate was 20% and 20%, respectively. Gentamicin poisoning induced downregulation of expression of Prestin in cochlear outer cochlea, and Otoferlin and F-Actin in cochlear hair cells in different regions.
CONCLUSIONS: Gentamicin poisoning can cause different degrees of damage to cochlea hair cells in different regions. Guinea pigs with gentamicin poisoning can recognize high-frequency ultrasonic signals.

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