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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Pediatric Spinal Ependymomas

Özden Erhan Sofuoğlu, Anas Abdallah

(Department of Neurosurgery, Health Science University, Bakirköy Research and Training Hospital for Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Istanbul, Turkey)

Med Sci Monit 2018; 24:7072-7089

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.910447


BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and radiological outcomes of surgical treatment for primary spinal ependymoma in children.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 46 primary spinal ependymoma patients who underwent surgery in BRSHH hospital during a 12-year period from 2004 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. All pediatric patients (patient age <18 years) were selected as the core sample used for this study.
RESULTS: This series included 1 female and 2 male patients between the ages of 9 and 17 years with mean age 13.3±3.9 years. The mean preoperative course was 9.1±10.5 months. The most common location was the lumbar spinal cord (n=2). The most common presenting symptoms was lower-limb weakness and numbness. Two tumors were located intradural-intramedullary and 1 was located intradural-extramedullary. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 2 patients, and a near-total resection was performed in 1 patient. No adjuvant treatment was received. The mean follow-up duration was 51.3±37.6 (17–98) months. No complications were recorded. Functional assessment of all patients by the latest follow-up evaluation showed good progress even though the patient is not fully recovered. At 6.3 years after the first operation, 1 patient presented with drop-seeding metastasis. No patients had neurofibromatosis type 2.
CONCLUSIONS: Laminoplasty and intraoperative neurophysiological monitorization are essential in surgical treatment of pediatric spinal ependymomas. GTR and recovery in pediatric spinal ependymoma are more likely than in adults. Despite the GTR, the risk of drop metastasis remains. Therefore, close clinical and radiological follow-up is recommended.

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