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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Confirmed Transmission of Bacterial or Fungal Infection to Kidney Transplant Recipients from Donated After Cardiac Death (DCD) Donors in China: A Single-Center Analysis

Qiquan Wan, Huanmiao Liu, Shaojun Ye, Qifa Ye

(Department of Transplant Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China (mainland))

Med Sci Monit 2017; 23:3770-3779

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.901884


BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate blood and urine cultures of donated after cardiac death (DCD) donors and report the cases of confirmed (proven/probable) transmission of bacterial or fungal infection from donors to kidney recipients.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-eight DCD donors between 2010 and 2016 were included. Sixty-one DCD donors underwent blood cultures and 22 episodes of bacteremias developed in 18 donors. Forty-three donors underwent urine cultures and 14 donors experienced 17 episodes of urinary infections.
RESULTS: Seven of 154 (4.5%) kidney recipients developed confirmed donor-derived bacterial or fungal infections. Inappropriate use of antibiotics in donor was a risk factor for donor-derived infection (p=0.048). The use of FK506 was more frequent in recipients without donor-derived infection than those with donor-derived infection (p=0.033). Recipients with donor-derived infection were associated with higher mortality and graft loss (42.9% and 28.6%, respectively), when compared with those without donor-derived infection (4.8% each). Three kidney recipients with donor-derived infection died; one death was due to multi-organ failure caused by Candida albicans, and two were related to rupture of the renal artery; two of them did not receive appropriate antimicrobial therapy after infection.
CONCLUSIONS: Our kidney recipients showed high occurrence rates of donor-derived infection. Recipients with donor-derived infection were associated with higher mortality and graft loss than those without donor-derived infection. The majority of recipients with donor-derived infection who died did not receive appropriate antimicrobial therapy after infection.

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