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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Polymorphisms of CHAT but not TFAM or VR22 are Associated with Alzheimer Disease Risk

Lili Gao, Yan Zhang, Jinghua Deng, Wenbing Yu, Yunxia Yu

(Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Hiser Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, China (mainland))

Med Sci Monit 2016; 22:1924-1935

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.895984


BACKGROUND: Alzheimer disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that is one of the most prevalent health problems among seniors. The cause of AD has not yet been elucidated, but many risk factors have been identified that might contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of AD. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies involving CHAT, TFAM, and VR22 polymorphisms and AD susceptibility to further understand the pathogenesis of AD.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: PubMed/Medline, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched for relevant articles. Rs1880676, rs2177369, rs3810950, and rs868750 of CHAT; rs1937 and rs2306604 of TFAM; and rs10997691 and rs7070570 of VR22 are studied in this meta-analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 51 case-control studies with 16 446 cases and 16 057 controls were enrolled. For CHAT, rs2177369 (G>A) in whites and rs3810950 (G>A) in Asians were found to be associated with AD susceptibility. No association was detected between rs1880676 and rs868750 and AD risk. For TFAM and VR22, no significant association was detected in studied single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).
CONCLUSIONS: Rs2177369 and rs3810950 of CHAT are associated with AD susceptibility, but rs1880676 and rs868750 are not. Rs1937 and rs2306604 of TFAM, and rs10997691 and rs7070570 of VR22 are not significantly associated with AD risk.

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