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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Patients with Single Brain Metastasis from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Equally Benefit from Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Surgery: A Systematic Review

Hong Qin, Cancan Wang, Yongyuan Jiang, Xiaoli Zhang, Yao Zhang, Zhihua Ruan

(Department of Oncology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland))

Med Sci Monit 2015; 21:144-152

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.892405


Abstract: Background: The appropriate treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with single brain metastasis (SBM) is still controversial. A systematic review was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of neurosurgery and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with SBM from NSCLC.
Material/Methods: PUBMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge, Current Controlled Trials, Clinical Trials, and 2 conference websites were searched to select NSCLC patients with only SBM who received brain surgery or SRS. SPSS 18.0 software was used to analyze the mean median survival time (MST) and Stata 11.0 software was used to calculate the overall survival (OS).
Results: A total of 18 trials including 713 patients were systematically reviewed. The MST of the patients was 12.7 months in surgery group and 14.85 months in SRS group, respectively. The 1, 2, and 5 years OS of the patients were 59%, 33%, and 19% in surgery group, and 62%, 33%, and 14% in SRS group, respectively. Furthermore, in the surgery group, the 1 and 3 years OS were 68% and 15% in patients with controlled primary tumors, and 50% and 13% in the other patients with uncontrolled primary tumors, respectively. Interestingly, the 5-year OS was up to 21% in patients with controlled primary tumors.
Conclusions: There was no significant difference in MST or OS between patients treated with neurosurgery and SRS. Patients with resectable lung tumors and SBM may benefit from the resection of both primary lesions and metastasis.

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