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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Preoperative prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in patients undergoing intranasal surgery

Brian D. Nicholas, Geeta Bhargave, Ayse Hatipoglu, Ryan Heffelfinger, Marc Rosen, Edmund A. Pribitkin

Med Sci Monit 2010; 16(8): CR365-368

ID: 881103


Background:    The goal of this study was to determine the rates of carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among patients undergoing intranasal surgery.
    Material/Methods:    One hundred and sixty five patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient rhinologic surgery over a six-month period were enrolled in the study. Patients completed a short questionnaire prior to surgery. Culture swabs of the anterior nares and nasal vestibule were sent to the microbiology lab for evaluation for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Cultures were grown on a MRSA-specific agar plate and were considered final after 48 hours of incubation. The primary endpoint was a positive MRSA culture.
    Results:    Of the one hundred fifty seven patients with nasal cultures taken, two had positive cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Of those with positive cultures, both had a history of prior infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
    Conclusions:    While antibiotic usage among the study group is far higher than the national average, the rates of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mirrors that described in other studies for the general population. The authors conclude that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus does not represent a significant source of infection among those undergoing intranasal surgery.

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