H-Index
75
Scimago Lab
powered by Scopus
JCR
Clarivate
Analytics
21%
Acceptance
Rate
call: +1.631.470.9640
Mon-Fri 10 am - 2 pm EST

Logo



eISSN: 1643-3750

Get your full text copy in PDF

Predictive value of routine transcutaneous tissue oxygen tension (tcpO2) measurement for the risk of non-healing and amputation in diabetic foot ulcer patients with non-palpable pedal pulses

Ruth Ladurner, Markus Küper, Ingmar Königsrainer, Stefan Löb, Dörte Wichmann, Alfred Königsrainer, Stephan Coerper, Stefan Beckert

Med Sci Monit 2010; 16(6): CR273-277

ID: 880609


Background:    It was evaluated whether transcutaneous tissue oxygen tension (tcpO2) measurement, when assessed in daily routine, can be used to predict the risk of non-healing and amputation in diabetic foot ulcer patients with non-palpable pedal pulses.
    Material/Methods:    Patients were followed up in an outpatient setting according to a comprehensive wound-care protocol. tcpO2 measurements were performed at the dorsum of the forefoot in a standardized setting. Patients were divided into three subgroups according to their initial tcpO2-readings (tcpO2 <20 mmHg, tcpO2 20–40 mmHg, tcpO2 >40 mmHg). Patients with clinical signs of soft tissue infection at the initial presentation were excluded.
    Results:    One hundred forty-one patients were enrolled. Wounds associated with a tcpO2 reading <20 mmHg demonstrated a significantly decreased probability of healing compared with those associated with a tcpO2 >40 mmHg (p=0.008). In addition, the risks of soft tissue infection (p=0.057) and hospitalization during follow-up (p=0.019) were different among the three groups. The overall amputation rate increased with decreasing tcpO2 (p=0.014) although there was no significant difference for major amputations (p=0.448).
    Conclusions:    Routine assessment of tcpO2 is suitable as a clinical screening tool for estimating the risk of non-healing in diabetic foot ulcer patients without palpable pedal pulses. However, its predictive value for the risk of amputation remains unclear.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
I agree