H-Index
75
Scimago Lab
powered by Scopus
JCR
Clarivate
Analytics
18%
Acceptance
Rate
call: +1.631.470.9640
Mon-Fri 10 am - 2 pm EST

Logo



eISSN: 1643-3750

Get your full text copy in PDF

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and the hypertriglyceridemic waist in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome

Hana Rosolova, Jaroslav Simon, Barbora Petrlova, Pavel Sifalda, Ivana Sipova

Med Sci Monit 2008; 14(8): CR411-415

ID: 865790


Background: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is an important biomarker of systemic inflammation. We studied the contribution to cardiovascular risk of increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with type 2 diabetes with or without concomitant metabolic syndrome.
Material and Method: The series included 381 patients (199 men, 182 women; median age, 66 years; age range, 50-80 years) with a mean duration of type 2 diabetes of 9+/-8 years. Standard physical examinations and laboratory investigations were administered to all patients. Modified National Cholesterol Education Program III criteria for defining the metabolic syndrome were used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was estimated by immunoturbidimetry and other laboratory tests using standard methods.
Results: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein correlated (Spearman's correlation) significantly positively with body mass index and waist size, fasting plasma triglyceride levels, apolipoprotein-B, gamma glutamyl transferase, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and fibrinogen, and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, only waist, fibrinogen, apolipoprotein-B, plasma glucose, and gamma glutamyl transferase levels appeared to be associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein on multiple logistic regression model analyses. In those diabetic patients with concomitant metabolic syndrome, the hypertriglyceridemic waist appeared to be a major factor for an increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration.
Conclusions: The hypertriglyceridemic waist contributes to the metabolic syndrome and most likely is an important factor increasing high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and consequently, relative coronary risk in patients with type 2 diabetes of any sex and age.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
I agree