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eISSN: 1643-3750

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The small peptide OGP(10-14) acts through Src kinases and RhoA pathways in Mo-7e cells: morphologic and immunologic evaluation

Letizia Mattii, Barbara Battolla, Stefania Moscato, Rita Fazzi, Sara Galimberti, Nunzia Bernardini, Amelio Dolfi, Mario Petrini

Med Sci Monit 2008; 14(6): BR103-108

ID: 859027


Background: Osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) is an endogenous tetradecapeptide present in micromolar concentrations in mammalian serum; its carboxy-terminal pentapeptide, OGP(10-14), represents its physiologically active fragment. OGP(10-14) induces proliferation and differentiation in fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, and it enhances hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo. The signaling pathways triggered by OGP(10-14) are not yet fully known. In the present report, we evaluated the effect of OGP(10-14) on differentiation of a cancer megakaryoblast cell line and its involvement on RhoA and Src family kinases signaling pathway.
Material and Method: Cell proliferation of the Mo-7e line was evaluated using the MTT test. Mo-7e differentiation was evaluated by microscopic observation of cell morphology and by expression of the factor VIII-related antigen. Involvement of RhoA and Src kinases on signaling pathways triggered by OGP(10-14) was analyzed using RhoA and Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitors (C3 and PP2) and an immunoperoxidase technique.
Results: OGP(10-14) induces expression of the factor VIII-related antigen, morphologic changes indicative of megakaryocytic differentiation, and a down-regulation of the Fyn Src kinase. These OGP(10-14) effects were prevented by C3 and enhanced by PP2.
Conclusions: The anti-proliferative and pro-differentiating activities of OGP(10-14) on thrombopoietin (TPO)-primed Mo-7e cells are mediated by RhoA and Src kinase pathways as demonstrated by the use of C3 and PP2.

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