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eISSN: 1643-3750

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Norepinephrine infusion increases interleukin-6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of brain-injured rats

John F. Stover, Oliver W. Sakowitz, Britta Schoning, Stefan Rupprecht, Stefan N. Kroppenstedt, Urlich W. Thomale, Christian Woiciechowsky, Andreas W. Unterberg

Med Sci Monit 2003; 9(10): BR382-388

ID: 13249


Background:Significantly increased plasma and CSF IL-6 levels reflect underlying tissue damage following clinical and experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Catecholamines, used under clinical conditions to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, induce a sustained IL-6 release. Thus an additional elevation in IL-6 could aggravate brain edema in the acute posttraumatic phase. We studied the changes in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IL-6 levels 4 and 24 hours after experimental TBI and assessed possible time-dependent effects of norepinephrine infusion on IL-6 and brain edema.Material/Methods:Paired plasma and CSF IL-6 measured at 4 and 24 hours following TBI (n=10) were compared to levels in non-traumatized rats (n=5). In a placebo-controlled trial, 20 brain-injured male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive norepinephrine or NaCl for 90 minutes at 4 or 24 hours after TBI. Plasma IL-6 was measured before, during, and after the infusion period. One hour after stopping the infusion, CSF IL-6 and hemispheric swelling were determined.Results:During the first posttraumatic day, plasma and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly increased compared to non-traumatized rats, reaching the highest values at 24 hours (p

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