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eISSN: 1643-3750

Effect of Low-Frequency Pulsed Ultrasound on Drug Delivery, Antibacterial Efficacy, and Bone Cement Degradation in Vancomycin-Loaded Calcium Phosphate Cement

Mingmin Shi, Lei Chen, Yangxin Wang, Wei Wang, Shigui Yan

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China (mainland)

Med Sci Monit 2018; 24: LBR797-802

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.908776

Available online: 2018-02-08

Published: 2018-02-08


#908776
#908776

BACKGROUND: Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been applied as a biodegradable antibiotic carrier in osteomyelitis. However, the drug delivery, antibacterial efficacy, and degradation rate of CPC are insufficient and require further improvement in clinical application.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Vancomycin-loaded CPC columns were prepared, and eluted in simulated body fluid. The drug delivery was assessed in the ultrasound group and control group by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The antibacterial efficacy of vancomycin in the ultrasound group and control groups was investigated by standard plate count method. Low-frequency pulsed ultrasound (46.5 kHz, 900 mW/cm²) was used to produce a sinusoidal wave in the ultrasound groups. The percentage of residual weight was evaluated to assess the degradation of CPC.
RESULTS: The concentration and cumulatively released percentage of vancomycin in the ultrasound group were higher than that in the control group at each time point (p<0.05). The duration of vancomycin concentration over the level of minimum inhibitory concentration was significantly prolonged in the ultrasound group (p<0.05). Antibacterial efficacy of vancomycin in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that in the control group with same concentration of vancomycin (p<0.05). The percentage of residual weight in the ultrasound group was significantly less than that in the control group (p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Low-frequency pulsed ultrasound can enhance vancomycin release, prolong the duration of vancomycin concentration at high levels, and accelerate the degradation rate of vancomycin-loaded CPC.

Keywords: Calcium Phosphates, Sound, Vancomycin



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