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eISSN: 1643-3750

Vitamin E Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

Lujian Peng, Xiangde Liu, Qian Lu, Tengqian Tang, Zhanyu Yang

Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland)

Med Sci Monit 2015; 21:1249-1255

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.893792

Available online:

Published: 2015-05-01


#893792

BACKGROUND: Some epidemiological studies have suggested that vitamin E intake reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer; however, this conclusion has not been supported by all the published studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between vitamin E intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer by combining the results from published articles.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We searched the published studies that reported the relationship between vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk using the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases through December 31st, 2014. Based on a fixed-effects or random-effects model, the RR and 95% CI were used to assess the combined risk.
RESULTS: In total, 10 observational studies (6 case-control studies and 4 cohort studies) were included. The overall RR (95% CI) of pancreatic cancer for the highest vs. the lowest level of vitamin E intake was 0.81 (0.73, 0.89). We found little evidence of heterogeneity (I2=19.8%, P=0.255). In the subgroup analyses, we found an inverse association between vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk both in the case-control and cohort studies. Additionally, this inverse association was not modified by different populations.
CONCLUSIONS: In our meta-analysis, there was an inverse association between vitamin E intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A high level of vitamin E might be a protective factor for populations at risk for pancreatic cancer.

Keywords: Adult, Aged, 80 and over, Anticarcinogenic Agents - administration & dosage, Antioxidants - physiology, Asia - epidemiology, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Dietary Supplements, Europe - epidemiology, Observational Studies as Topic - statistics & numerical data, Pancreatic Neoplasms - prevention & control, Research Design, Risk, Risk Factors, Sample Size, United States - epidemiology, Vitamin E - physiology, young adult



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