H-Index
79
Scimago Lab
powered by Scopus
JCR
Clarivate
Analytics
15%
Acceptance
Rate
call: +1.631.470.9640
Mon-Fri 10 am - 2 pm EST

Logo

Medical Science Monitor Basic Research
AmJCaseRep

Annals
ISI-Home

eISSN: 1643-3750

Elevated circulating transforming growth factor β-1 may explain poorer renal survival in type II diabetics with chronic hepatitis C

Michael C. Peterson

Med Sci Monit 2007; 13(5): RA81-85

ID: 484619

Available online: 2007-05-04

Published: 2007-05-04


Hepatitis C is reported to be associated with poorer renal survival in patients with diabetes. The mechanism for this observation has not been elucidated. Transforming growth factor β-1 is involved in signaling for human disease involving fi brosis and excess matrix deposition including diabetic nephropathy. Hepatitis C virus core protein is known to upregulate transcription of TGF β-1 in the liver and HCV patients have elevated levels of circulating TGF β-1 versus controls. There is evidence that elevated circulating TGF β-1 levels result in more rapid progression of nephropathy and that lowering circulating TGF β-1 levels with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor correlates with treatment effi cacy in diabetic nephropathy. This paper outlines a hypothesis that the elevated level of circulating TGF β-1 which is associated with HCV is a mediator of more rapid progression of diabetic renal disease in persons with HCV.

Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - physiopathology, Comorbidity, Diabetic Nephropathies - physiopathology, Disease Progression, Hepatitis C, Chronic - physiopathology, Signal Transduction - physiology, Transforming Growth Factor beta1 - metabolism



Back