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Evaluation of a neurotherapy program for a child with ADHD with Benign Partial Epilepsy with Rolandic Spikes (BPERS) using event-related potentials

Maria Pąchalska, Iurii D. Kropotov, Grzegorz Mańko, Małgorzata Lipowska, Anna Rasmus, Beata Łukaszewska, Marta Bogdanowicz, Andrzej Mirski

Med Sci Monit 2012; 18(11): CS94-104

DOI: 10.12659/MSM.883531

Published: 2012-10-31


Background:    We hypothesized that there would be a good response to relative beta training, applied to regulate the dynamics of brain function in a patient with benign partial epilepsy with Rolandic Spikes (BPERS), associated with neuropsychiatric deficits resembling the symptoms of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
    Case Report:    The patient, E.Z., age 9.3, was suffering from neuropsychiatric symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, especially attention deficits, and behavioral changes, rendering him unable to function independently in school and in many situations of everyday life. He was treated for epilepsy, but only slight progress was made. The patient took part in 20 sessions of relative beta training combined with behavioral training. We used standardized neuropsychological testing, as well as ERPs before the experiment and after the completion of the neurotherapy program. Neuropsychological testing at baseline showed multiple cognitive deficits. Over the course of neurotherapy, E.Z.’s verbal and non-verbal IQ increased significantly. His cognitive functions also improved, including immediate and delayed logical and visual recall on the WMS-III, maintaining attention on the WMS-III, and executive functions, but remained below norms. Physiologically, the patient showed substantial changes after neurotherapy, including fewer spikes and an increased P300 NOGO component.
    Conclusions:    The cognitive deficits characteristic for ADHD in a child with BPERS may be unresponsive to antiepileptic treatment, but are reversible after a carefully selected neurotherapy program, combined with antiepileptic treatment. Event Related Potentials (ERPs) in the GO/NOGO task can be used to assess functional brain changes induced by neurotherapeutical programs.

Keywords: Male, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Humans, Evoked Potentials - physiology, Epilepsy, Rolandic - therapy, Electroencephalography, Child, Beta Rhythm - physiology, Behavior, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - therapy, Neuropsychological Tests, Photic Stimulation, Semantics, Time Factors, Writing



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