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Salt iodination as a effective method of iodine supplementation.

Agnieszka Kondracka, Milena Słoń, Wiesław Grzesiuk, Marzena Wojda, Janusz Nauman

Med Sci Monit 2002; 8(4): CR288-291

ID: 420866

Published:


BACKGROUND: In January 1997 a new approach to preventing iodine deficiencywas introduced in Poland. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the mandatory iodizationof kitchen salt (30 mg KI/kg) has had any impact on ioduria. MATERIAL/METHODS: The study was performedon 29 healthy volunteers, aged 22-29 (average age 23.93 +/- 1.14), examined in 1996 and retested after36 months of iodine supplementation in 1999. Each person underwent a physical examination and thyroidultrasonography. The iodine level was determined using morning urine samples. RESULTS: For the durationof the study thyroid volume remained unchanged, ranging from 11.48 I3.89 ml in 1996 to 12.11 +/- 3.85ml in 1998. The echostructure was normal in all subjects both in 1996 and in 1999. In 1996 the iodineconcentration in urine (ICU) in the study group averaged 100.4 +/- 41.5 mg/L (range from 43.3 to 175.6microg/L). Seventeen persons had an iodine concentration below 100 microg/L. In 1999 the average ICUwas 140.7 +/- 78.87 microg/L. Three subjects had a lower ICU in 1999 (53.93 +/- 24.65 microg/L) thanin 1996 (104.1 +/- 24.6 microg/L). These persons claimed to have completely eliminated the use of addedsalt in their diet. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that mandatory iodine supplementation method is sufficientlyeffective when salt is used in the diet. In the case of restrictions on salt consumption the use of preparationscontaining iodine should be recommended.

Keywords: Adult, Diet, Sodium-Restricted, Female, Food Habits, Humans, Hypertension, Iodine, Male, Organ Size, Poland, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Sodium Iodide, Thyroid Gland



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